Five Ways to Decorate with Ultraviolet

 My digs at dear family friends’ when I visit them in London.

My digs at dear family friends’ when I visit them in London.

If you are at all interested in interior design it cannot have escaped your notice that the Pantone Colour Of the year for 2018 is Ultraviolet. As the year draws to a close you might spot purples appearing in all sorts of products and interior schemes. If you are intrigued by enigmatic, mystical and unconventional Ultraviolet but unsure how you can incorporate it into your home here, are a few pointers to help you create a successful scheme.


Quantity

When it comes to using a ‘marmite’ decorating colour like purple you might want to consider first whether for you it is a case of more is more or less is more. Are you prepared to fully commit and paint large expanses of it on all the walls? Or will a few sprigs of lavender styled into a collection of vases be enough for you? In a small room with minimal natural light, such as a downstairs loo, you can afford to go wild with a rich, dark, deep purple all over. You won’t spend a long time in there so the drama will be exciting and enjoyable for short periods. In a larger room where you pass more time, unless you are a real purple lover and feeling game you may prefer to use purple in a smaller portion on armchair upholstery, bedding, a throw or art print. 

Intensity

Pantone are celebrating Ultraviolet in a range of shades this year, so there’s no reason why you can’t vary the intensity of the purple(s) you choose and turn the saturation ‘volume’ up high with an intense, rich tone. Or dial it down and go for the pastel, lilac end end of the purple spectrum. 

Texture

Colour can never be considered in isolation in interior design. Sometimes the surface it is applied to can make or break the scheme. Deep purple looks sumptuous on a luxurious velvet, but that chocolate bar wrapper shade of paint can make shelves or walls look flat and cheap, even garish. There are no real rules about what works and what doesn’t but always bear the finish in mind and consider whether it really suits the colour (and please yourself!). 

Colour Pairings

Unless you want to be fully immersed in ultraviolet on every wall you might be asking ‘what else does it go with?’ In which case there are a few options. The complimentary colour of purple is yellow and that could be a zingy tone or a more sedate mustard. If the purple you choose is closer to blue then orange would be its compliment. Or for a more harmonious (as opposed to contrasting) colour scheme you could also incorporate the colours either side of purple on the Colour Wheel. These would be blues and pinks and together with purple would form what’s called an Analogous colour scheme, very easy on the eye as nothing jars. 

Contrast 

Feature walls are generally not talked about too kindly these days. I think it’s perhaps because in most examples the feature wall is really loud and often busy with pattern and the walls around it are white or close enough, and its the stark contrast between the two that makes the feature wall a bit of a screamer. For a more soothing atmosphere consider reducing the contrast between the purple and other elements in the room. A rich aubergine purple colour palette might better suit wooden furniture or shelving in an equally rich walnut, as opposed to a light pine, for example. 


Browse my collection of favourite ultraviolet / purple interiors on my Ultraviolet Pinterest board and see if you can become inspired to use it in your home. If you do and feel proud of your purpley creation then if you live in Bristol please do share a photo of your success with us on instagram using the hashtag #mybristolhome for a chance to be featured!